Apr 04 2014
CASINO TABLE FELT
Check out the great KISS table felt spotted at San Manuel Casino last night.

Thanks to Ron Buckley for the photo!
Apr 04 2014
PAUL STANLEY TALKS LA TO GOOD DAY LA


Apr 04 2014
PHOTO: ERIC SINGER'S DRUM KIT AT SAN MANUEL
Apr 04 2014
CAPPUCINO!
Apr 04 2014
LA OPENING NIGHT COLLECTORS' ITEMS
LA KISS is pleased to announce two limited edition collectors’ items on Opening Night this Saturday! The first 10,000 fans will receive a commemorative guitar pick and rally towel. Tickets available here - http://www.ticketmaster.com/LA-Kiss-tickets/artist/1938763
Apr 03 2014
NEW PHOTO BOMB APP
Add some Rock ‘n Roll to your photos and text messages with KISS PHOTO BOMB!

Apply KISS effects, KISS band members, KISS frames and more.
Share your KISSIFIED photos with friends via Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter. Send KISS emoticons to rock out your text messages.
KISS PHOTO BOMB brought to you by KISS, Live Nation and Bare Tree Media.

DOWNLOAD THE FREE APP!
Apr 03 2014
VOTED #1 LIVE ACT OF 2013 IN BURRN! READERS' POLL
JAPAN LOVES KISS!

In the April Edition of the 2013 Readers' Poll of the Japanese Burrn Magazine, KISS scored Number One in the live performance section beating out Metallica at Number 2!

Best,
Keith Terrrier
Apr 03 2014
AN ACOUSTIC EVENING WITH TONIGHT!
Celebrating the Kickoff of LA KISS Football

To celebrate the launch of the LA KISS, the newest expansion team in the Arena Football League and co-owned by Gene Simmons and Paul Stanley, KISS will be performing an acoustic set tonight, April 3rd, 2014 at San Manuel Indian Bingo & Casino.

This once-in-a-lifetime fan experience will feature limited seating for a truly intimate experience with one of the greatest acts in rock & roll history.
Apr 03 2014
SIGHTING: JEEP IN TEXAS
KISS IS EVERYWHERE!

Spotted in a parking lot in Tyler, Texas!

John Montgomery
Apr 03 2014
CELEBRATES 40TH WITH CROWDSOURCING CAMPAIGN
Gene Simmons is looking for help celebrating the 40th anniversary of Kiss.

The rocker announced Wednesday night that Kiss is launching a campaign on Tongal -- a company that pairs creatives and brands to crowdsource the pitch-and-development process -- asking content creators and fans to submit their best ideas for "how Kiss should celebrate their 40th anniversary in the most epic way possible."

Typically, Tongal's brand campaigns involve ideation and pitch processes before moving on to an execution stage where a commercial or campaign is produced. Past projects have included a Star Wars-inspired commercial for Pringles and a Speed Stick ad that aired during the 2013 Super Bowl.

But the Kiss project is part of a new service called Left Field, which allows brands to reach out to creators and fans through a 140-character social media call-to-action to help brainstorm ideas.

"We've always been about the fans," Simmons tells THR. "Tongal allows our fans to throw out ideas, and you know you're going to make something authentic."

He adds that the crowdsourcing process at Tongal is not that different from the collaboration within a band. "One person doesn't play every instrument. You contribute where you're skilled."

Simmons announced the campaign as part of his appearance at Tongal's inaugural award show the Tongies, which was held April 2 at the El Rey Theatre. He handed out the award for best Best Original Song used in a campaign. Other awards included Best Broadcast Spot, Best Comedy, Best Idea and Video of the Year.

Creatives who participate in Tongal's projects get paid if they submit winning ideas. This year, Tongal expects to pay more than $15 million to its community.

Tongal co-founder and president James DeJulio says the Kiss campaign represents an opportunity for brands to use the platform to engage fans.

"Like any great brand, Kiss' fans have supported them and been a part of their lives forever," he adds. "This campaign creates another deep connection with the band."
Apr 02 2014
by John Katic

Paul Stanley has risen to international fame playing the role of the Starchild in Kiss.

However, in his upcoming autobiography, Face the Music: A Life Exposed (HarperOne), the guitarist discusses two other roles he has played that have affected his life as much if not more: the Phantom of the Opera and family man.

The market for rock autobiographies has been fertile lately, and many tend to follow the same formula of addiction, conflict, conquests on the road and business deals gone bad.

Stanley’s book takes a more unique path as he opens up about nagging feelings of emptiness, even as the band was at the height of their Seventies mega-stardom. He also is candid about his relationship with Kiss co-founder Gene Simmons.

We recently had the opportunity to talk to Stanley about Face The Music.

GUITAR WORLD: All of the other original members of Kiss have written books. What made this the right time for you?

I never saw writing a book. I think, just by nature of what they are, autobiographies are fatally flawed. Most of the time they tend to be grandiose in their perspective because someone is writing about themselves. I had no desire to do that. Honestly, I’ve looked at most autobiographies and thought they should have been on soft tissue paper on a roll and they would serve a better purpose. Just to write about real or imagined victories or successes or achievements isn’t what I wanted to do.

When I finally realized I could write a book that could be inspirational, that could show that everyone has obstacles and even the people we might look up to and aspire to be have been through their own trials and tribulations and can succeed, that was intriguing. The idea of writing a book my children could read to understand what I've been through to be where I am was what really made me do a 180-degree turn.

I didn’t want to write a book about Kiss. I wanted to write about my life. I wanted to write about somebody who faced a lot of adversity and obstacles and thought they knew how to resolve them and found out I wrong. I was fortunate enough to achieve the success I thought was the answer, and then I was fortunate enough to roll up my sleeves and figure out what it really took to find contentment and happiness.

The book has a happy ending. Otherwise, I couldn’t have written it. People have told me it’s a great book. If I were still stuck in the middle of it, I wouldn’t have written it.
Apr 02 2014
by Richard Bienstock

Maybe it’s the makeup. Maybe it’s the merchandising. Maybe, at the end of the day, it’s just the music itself.

Whatever the source, it is safe to say that few bands have inspired as much fervent devotion—and also rabid derision—as the self-proclaimed “Hottest Band in the World,” Kiss.

But love them or hate them (and really, is there any area in between?), Kiss—and in particular its stalwart co-founders, visionaries and greatest proponents and protectors, Paul Stanley and Gene Simmons—continue to not only exist but also scale greater heights.

Here we are in 2014, and the band, now roughly 10 lineups in with current guitarist Tommy Thayer and drummer Eric Singer, are experiencing yet another renaissance.

Their most recent (and 20th) studio album, Monster, was an unusually strong effort, more energetic and enjoyable than should reasonably be expected from any band at this stage of its career. Meanwhile, on the live front, Kiss continue to push the limits of just how much of an over-the-top spectacle a rock and roll show can truly be (for evidence, check out videos of recent performances that feature their newly designed Spider stage).

But 2014 is also offering up another nice pair of victories for the band. This year marks Kiss’ 40th anniversary (their self-titled debut was released in February 1974), and in April, Stanley and Simmons, along with former, and now estranged, original members Ace Frehley and Peter Criss, will be inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

To celebrate these dual milestones, Guitar World met separately with Stanley and Simmons at their Los Angeles homes to discuss just a few of the many triumphs and tribulations that led the band here.

Additionally, they were asked to examine the inner workings of their unique partnership as well as to offer a few candid thoughts on the many guitarists that have passed through Kiss’ ranks, from Frehley to Thayer and everyone in between. (As for the ones that almost made it? That list includes Eddie Van Halen…depending on who you ask.)
Apr 02 2014
LA ON COVER OF GAME CHANGER MAGAZINE
Apr 02 2014
Nothin’ to Lose: Gene Simmons and Paul Stanley Go for Broke As They Weigh In on Kiss Guitarists Past and Present

by Richard Bienstock

In this feature from the April 2014 issue of Guitar World, Gene Simmons and Paul Stanley go for broke as they weigh in on Kiss guitarists past and present.

ACE FREHLEY

GENE SIMMONS As a musician, you have to hand it to him. He knew his stuff. And when he cared—the first three records, I would say—he was great. You can sing those solos. It was like opera. And the integrity of his style was instantly recognizable. As soon as he played, you knew it was him. That’s probably the highest compliment you can give to a guitar player.

PAUL STANLEY In the beginning, we just gelled as guitarists. And even today, I talk about Ace a lot. I’ll tell people, “He really had the goods.” He can argue all he wants that he still does, or say whatever he wants to say the reasons are that he didn’t ascend to more. Everyone’s entitled to their opinion. But I saw somebody throw away a gift.

SIMMONS Before the drugs and the booze and everything, he was basically Ace, a lovable, loving guy. We all cared for him. I loved him. I love the straight Ace. But I fucking hate any drug addict. Because they’re possessed.

VINNIE VINCENT

STANLEY Vinnie had an incredible touch and an incredible knowledge of the guitar. But left to his own devices he’d hang himself. For somebody who could play so brilliantly and so tastefully, it became more about how much he could play rather than what he played. And, ultimately, I couldn’t understand what he chose to play. And that’s not taking into account all the other stuff about him, which I think has been well documented.

SIMMONS He was a much more accomplished musician [than Frehley]. Understood some jazz. Could play faster. He was a big fan of all that sort of hurricane machine-gun stuff. But he was not as pure in his personality. We wrote “I Love It Loud” together, although he hated me for telling him what to play in the solo. But the guy could write songs.
Apr 02 2014
GENE SIMMONS RECEIVES A SPECIAL LETTER
Check out this wonderful letter Gene Simmons received from Victor.

Note from Mending Kids International

A couple months ago, Victor received surgery to correct his bladder. This surgery was made possibly largely because of Gene Simmons's generosity and kindness. Gene stopped by our board meeting yesterday and we were able to give him Victor's thank you letter.

CLICK HERE to donate to Mending Kids today!
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