News - 2009 : October

Oct 02 2009
"DEUCE" CLIP FROM MONTREAL
KISSONLINE
Here's another great fan-filmed clip - "DEUCE" from KISS' Montreal show last night.

Oct 02 2009
"ROCK AND ROLL ALL NITE" CLIP FROM MONTREAL
KISSONLINE
Here's another great fan-filmed clip - "Rock N Roll All Nite" from KISS' Montreal show last night.

Oct 02 2009
SONIC BOOM EUROPEAN TRAILER
ROADRUNNER RECORDS UK
Here's the SONIC BOOM European Trailer

Oct 02 2009
SONIC BOOM IS THE ALBUM OF THE YEAR
KISSONLINE FAN LETTER
Hey KISS Army!

Well, I've been a fan since the late 70's and this is the album I've been waiting for for years. It's easily their best since Creatures of the Night and quite possibly since Rock and Roll Over. It captures the spirit of their early recordings with some of the muscle from their 80's stuff. "Say Yeah" is an absolute barnstormer of an anthem and just about every song hits the mark. Gene's contribution is his best in years. Paul is in top form and Eric and Tommy deserve a lot of credit for helping to create this. It's great to hear those "Rock'n'Roll" solo's back in Kiss music again. It's been a long time since I've genuinely been excited about a new album but Sonic Boom in my view is THE album of the year and easily deserves a 10/10.

Mick Burgess

LETTERS

Oct 02 2009
"I STOLE YOUR LOVE" CLIP FROM MONTREAL
KISSONLINE
Here's a great fan-filmed clip of "I Stole Your Love" from KISS' Montreal show last night.

Oct 02 2009
FANTAR NOW AT TWITTER
KISSONLINE
Show your support for KISS and get a Twitter profile picture Fantar now!

KISS Fantar is your Twitter profile avatar service officially endorsed and approved by KISS. Transform your current Twitter profile picture to a KISS Fantar in seconds and show your support for the Hottest Band in the World!

Get your KISS FANTAR now
Oct 02 2009
SUN MEDIA
For KISS and frontman Paul Stanley, it's full steam ahead

By DARRYL STERDAN, Sun Media

KISS Army lifers who feared the band would never make another studio album are in good company -- even Paul Stanley had given up on the idea.

Sessions for the band's 1998 reunion album with original guitarist Ace Frehley and drummer Peter Criss went so badly that the star-sporting frontman had no desire to return to the studio.

"What soured me was Psycho Circus," admits a subdued Stanley.

"It was a heartfelt attempt to make a band album where there was no band. It culminated with a lot of delusional people who were talking through attorneys instead of being in the studio, and this weird sense of entitlement from people that they had some sort of birthright to have songs on an album whether or not they're good. When you have bandmembers who see the band as a way to further themselves rather than seeing themselves as a way to further the band, you're in trouble.

"Besides that, it had also reached a point where there were a lot of co-writers outside the band, which means you're not doing your job. Basically, it means you're allowing somebody else to interpret who you are instead of just being who you are.

"So there were a lot of reasons that I didn't want to do another KISS album. I didn't want to make an album that we had to apologize for or had to qualify."
Oct 02 2009
NEWSDAY
'Gene Simmons Family Jewels," the A&E reality show starring the spidery, fire-breathing, tongue-dangling KISS bassist as a family man, is stuffed with slumber parties, home movies, teen girls saying, "Whatever," and (somewhat randomly) a depressed comedian Carrot Top at a bar. But it doesn't have Paul Stanley. "God knows, he's asked me enough times," says singer and guitarist Stanley, who co-founded the band with Simmons in 1972. "There's nothing that appeals to me less than creating a TV life, as opposed to living my private life. It's just not for me. I also don't like the idea of confusing what Gene does with what KISS does. It's better to keep 'em separate."

For a man who has spent the past 37 years wearing demonic black-and-white makeup and singing "Love Gun" wearing leather pants and no shirt, Stanley, 57, is pointedly serious on the phone. Asked about Casablanca Records, the '70s disco label that broke KISS and was known for its executives' copious cocaine use and excessive behavior, Stanley says he spent little time there. Asked about Ace Frehley, the fellow band founder who spends much of his newfound solo career bashing KISS as sellouts in the press, Stanley says he's just glad the guitarist is clean and sober. Asked what he wants for Christmas, Stanley delivers a mini-lecture about supporting the American troops in Afghanistan and Iraq.
Oct 01 2009
CLEVELAND CLIP
KISSONLINE
Here's a great fan-filmed clip of "Shout It Out Loud" from KISS' Cleveland show on Monday.

Oct 01 2009
PAUL INTERVIEW ON CHOM
KISSONLINE
Check out Paul Stanley's interview from earlier today (Thursday, October 1) on the "The Metal File" podcast from Montreal's CHOM-FM.

CLICK HERE to hear Paul's interview.
Oct 01 2009
CREW SETS UP COBO ARENA STAGE
KISSONLINE EXCLUSIVE
A tribute to the extremely hard-working crew that makes the KISS stage show possible each night. If you've ever wanted to peek behind the scenes and see exactly what goes into setting up the greatest rock show on the planet... now's your chance!

Oct 01 2009
LUMINO MAGAZINE
Written by and photos by JOHN DAVISSON

As a teenager in the late 70's, I began getting into rock music, slowly, by buying an album here and there and listening to records at friends' houses, or maybe borrowing the album. This was long before MySpace and Napster, before iPods and satellite radio. Rock music hit us in shortly before high school and it was new. There was no Britney Spears, Miley Cyrus or Jonas Brothers to draw us into pop music during our elementary school days. Radio was abysmal for my friends and me mostly because disco and oldies dominated. Our mantra was "disco sucks" and although now I can have a nostalgic interest in disco, back then good ass-kicking rock music was the fodder of youth.

Bands like Rush fed our cerebral interests; we would not have heard of Ayn Rand if not for drummer Neil Peart. Queen fed our operatic yearnings, Aerosmith was our roots-rock, Ted Nugent fed our machismo. For sophisticated music, we pulled out the Yes and Emerson, Lake and Palmer albums. But for many of us disaffected youth, it was Kiss that was the standard bearer. We wanted to rock and roll all night and party every day, and Kiss had the rock anthems for us. We were recruited into the Kiss Army, drawing Kiss logos on our notebooks, jackets and whatever we could get our hands on (this was before rap and the graffiti tagging craze).
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